Home German Foods and Recipes The German Cold Cut Expedition- Fred Reich and Hickory Sweet
The German Cold Cut Expedition- Fred Reich and Hickory Sweet

The German Cold Cut Expedition- Fred Reich and Hickory Sweet

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German Cold cutsWhen I was young (ok, and now) German Cold Cuts (Aufschnitt)  like Schinken, Cervelat, Fleishwurst,  and Leberwurst HAD to be on the table.

Not Bologna

Not Roast Turkey or Roast Beef

My family ate Zungenwurst, Blutwurst, and Mettwurst and Gelbwurst.

Sadly, the deli department of our local grocery store didn’t carry anything like that. So mom had to go further out to find the foods she loved (and recognized). A few times a year we would take an expedition to see Fred Reich, of Hickory Sweet Meats, a South Central Los Angeles institution.

Fred Reich and Hickory Sweet Meats

My memories of Hickory Sweet meats begin in the early 1970’s. Mom would let friends know that she was headed out to get Aufschnitt, and they would give her a list of what they wanted. Then she put a cooler in the back of our Monte Carlo, and load us up, and off we’d go.

german cold cutsI remember being overwhelmed by the size of the Hickory Sweet. This was no small operation. Huge! With long display counters loaded with meats and cold cuts that you couldn’t get anywhere else. You had to pull a number, and often we had to wait a while because of the crowds. It was never boring, Butchers in white coats hustled to fill orders and give samples. Everything was clean. There was that spicy, salty smell that I love.

Then it was our turn.

The men behind the counter always spoke German with my mom. And they always handed me a fresh Knackwurst to munch while filling the order. Sometimes, Fred Reich himself would be there, alongside his people, talking and making sure that everything was running according to German plan. (I always remember thinking he must be famous…. not only did he have a shop, he had a German radio program that ran every Sunday Morning. )

All of the Aufschnitt would be wrapped in crisp white butcher paper, and a note about the contents and price were scribbled in grease pencil on the outside, so you knew what it was when you got home. Westphalian Schinken, Leberwurst, and thick slices of LeberKase (our favorite) for frying. Wiener, Bratwurst of all kinds, Suppenwurst and Weiss Wurst.

german cold cutsFinally we were done… our cooler neatly packed with delicious Aufschnitt for lunches. That night we would often have fresh Wurstchen for dinner…. YUM

Fred Reich passed away years ago, and his Hickory Sweet store closed. The neighborhood continued to change, and the world got smaller. German foods were available in more locations. In fact, today, my local grocery store sells many of my favorites like Wurstchen and Bratwurst. But, like my mother, I still occasionally load up my car with a cooler for an Aufschnitt expedition, because my kids like Leberkase too.

How did a German Butcher end up In South Central Los Angeles?

A short aside…..For those of you familiar with South Central Los Angeles, I’m sure you are wondering how a German Butcher shop landed in this neighborhood. Remember, Los Angeles before the 1950’s and 1960’s had a different demographic. Fred built his shop when the area was a quiet middle class part of LA. As the world around him changed, he never did. His meats were always fresh, and delicious, and he cared about the neighborhood. Smoked meats, sausages and his cold cuts were popular with his new African American neighbors. There are many rumors about his generosity, and free hand outs to the less fortunate locals. During the Watts Riots, the neighborhood repaid him by protecting his business from fire and looting.

Time continued to pass, and the world continued to change. The neighborhood became more Hispanic, and with that came a change in tastes. Finally, Hickory Sweet closed its doors for the last time.

Gone, but not forgotten. I have searched for hours for photos of Fred Reich and the Hickory Sweet store…. but I can’t find anything. Does anyone out there have a photo they could share? Or a memory?

Take the time to read the Comments Below!

Some people who knew the shop, and even some who knew Fred Reich personally, have shared information. And some are looking for other people who may have been involved in the store. 

UPDATE-
I found out where one of Fred Reich’s Apprentices ended up !
Alex Lagger- http://www.latimes.com/food/la-fo-5-questions-alex-lagger-20150919-story.html
T
ime for another ROAD TRIP

 

Hickory Sweet Is Gone, But You Can Still Order German Sausage

International Bratwurst Sampler – $53.99

The International Bratwurst Sampler includes a variety of fresh bratwurst sausages hand made with all Wisconsin products, but with international flavors. The sampler includes 1.5 pounds each of German, Greek, Italian, and Hungarian Bratwurst. The German

Bavaria Snacking Sausage Sampler – $35.90

A variety box for sausage lovers that includes four pairs landjager and three flavors of all-beef summer sausage: blue ribbon award winner Bavaria Beef Summer Sausage, which is naturally hickory smoked for outstanding flavor; Bavaria Pfefferjager Summer S

Octoberfest Bratwurst Sampler 1 – $57.65

Bavaria’s Octoberfest Bratwurst Sampler 1 includes one 4 pack of Knackwurst, one 5 pack of Red Lager Beer Bratwurst, one 6 pack of Nurnberger Bratwurst, one 5 pack of Munich Weisswurst and one 5 pack of Smoked Bratwurst. All varieties are pre-cooked and




Comment(24)

  1. Very fond memories of Hickory Sweet! My family lived on 87th and San Pedro. I lived here until I was 3.

    You could smell the bread baking!

    We would always return to Hickory Sweet with my great grandma who always bought her meats here and treat her grand children to the most delicious cookies!

    We would buy Smoked turkey to have for holidays!

    Thanks for bringing back a memory from past!

  2. Just thinking about when I was growing up and just some things that brought good memories, the hickory sweet market was the best even though the neighborhood wasn’t but that was our store best cookies ever!!

  3. This was the most wonderful place in the world. My family owned a business nearby on Broadway and we always bought our meats here. The quality, freshness and taste could not be beaten. I can still recall and it’s been years! Some of our favorite things here were the deli meats german salame and the black forrest ham, their bacon, head cheese (both hot and mild), steaks, ribs, roasts, just everything. The bakery was superb with everything ranging from crusty bread, brownies, tea cakes, cheesecakes cut into squares. I could go on and on. The owner was a very kind-hearted man who made everyone feel welcome. Staff was awesome. This store represents a huge part of my growing up in LA. Times were different then. Fred Reich stood the test of time and did not flee a changing demographic. He was a generous man, always donating to the local schools and churches in the surrounding area. The store actually inspired me to take up German in school and though I rarely get to speak it, it was always fun going there and speaking with them. They always encouraged me and helped me with my phrasing. Nothing compares to them!!! Nothing!!!

  4. Omg, I remember Hickory Sweet and FRED TOO. I lived down the same street they were on. My dad and mom shopped there often. I remember going in sometimes after school which was across the street Fred would hand me a weiner the best ever the skin would snap. Loved it. Also the cream puffs. I remember it all. Our family lived there since the 1950’s. A black family that supported the German deli and bakery until they closed.

  5. My grandparents lived on a farm in Compton..I know hard to believe, but Fred and his family moved in nearby having emigrated from Germany He use to help my grandfather butcher the steers and pigs on the farm. Then he opened a small shop selling his meats., which grew to the block long store we all remember. We would also pack a cooler, tell everyone we were going to Fred’s (I didn’t really know the name Hickory Sweet till I was a teenager). When we got there Fred would come out and hug all of us, reminding my mother he will always remember her in overalls and pigtails. I loved the lunch meat and bread but my favorite thing was the lundjuggers. The were always hanging on a string running above the counters drying out. They beat any beef jerky today. I actually found a butcher shop at Pike Street Market in Seattle that sold them and they tasted just like Fred’s. I bought extra in a package and am bringing them to our family Christmas to share the memories.

  6. Hi everybody,
    I am writing fom Germany. Accidentaly I found this comments. I´m In the process of the genealogcial research of my familiy´s history andI found out that Fred Reich born 27.11.1901 in Bad Urach was the son of my grand grandfather. Now I try to find familiymembers. If anybody knows the familiy please contact them and give them my e mail: sandystuttgart@gmx.de. or kontakt me to give me some informations that I can find them. It would be so great to get in tough with them.
    If possible it would be very nice if you can help.

  7. I have many memeories also of my parents taking our family there. Besides the free wiener, I remember a round white cookie with a rainbow of colored sprinkles all over them, I remember loving them but I have never had them or seen them again since we moved away when I was six, anyone out there remember them and know what they were called? Also, I remember my parents would always buy a blue circular tin with small squares of hard toffee’s that were individually wrapped in white paper, they were so good, anyone know info on those as well, my sweet tooth has been dreaming them for over 30 years….I’m also interested if anyone has a picture of Hickory Sweets inside or outside, I’d be curious if It jogged any memories….

    1. There are a few others here who remember… maybe someone has the answer
      Sad.. I did a google search, and can’t find photos of the place. Of course, this was a time before everyone felt the need to photograph everything

    2. Yes I remember the cookies with the sprinkles, the fresh meats & the party time orange drink in the carton. Good memories of living on 87th Place & Broadway in the 70’s.

  8. Thank you so much for sharing! I was just enjoying a FB discussion of a (closed) Whittier German deli (Schirmers) and mentioned that they used only Fred Reich meats. My family would drive there in the 50’s from Whittier in our ’52 Chevy so my German mom could stock up. I vaguely remember the Hickory Sweet name, but we always referred to it as Fred Reich. I also remember the German wiener with the ‘snap’ at the bite, and cannot leave a German deli these days without unwrapping the wieners and having one on the way home.
    Christmas was extravagant at Hickory Sweet with the multitude of chocolates and cookies!
    Shopping here in my childhood has set a lifetime precedent of always finding the nearest German deli wherever I live, and becoming a regular customer.

  9. I loved reading all these comments and the story. My grandfather was a butcher there. I practically grew up there. My uncle also worked there!

  10. Back in the fifties when I was 11, every Saturday my mother drove me up to Los Angeles to go to German school to learn high German because I only spoke Bavarian. On the way home we always stopped at Hickory Sweet to get our wurst. I always got a free wiener from Fred or one of the other butchers. It was always a treat that I looked forward too.

  11. Glad to find this post.I’ve always wondered about the istory of the place.We went there all of my life until they closed. It was amazing. Now we just go to Alpine Village in Torrance.

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