Home German Foods and Recipes German Beer and Wine What is Maibowle? A Refreshing Wine Punch from Germany!
What is Maibowle? A Refreshing Wine Punch from Germany!

What is Maibowle? A Refreshing Wine Punch from Germany!

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what is maibowleMy mother often made a Bowle when we had large party. These wine punches were a refreshing hit on warm summer afternoons in Southern California. Usually, they were made with wine, a bit of sugar, maybe some brandy, and fruit or herbal ingredients to give them more flavor. One of the more famous Bowles… a Maibowle…. But… What is Maibowle? A May Punch? What’s in it? What does it taste like? Are the ingredients available in the US? And most important… where can I get the recipe for Maibowle??

Let me try to answer all your questions here….

What is Maibowle?

Maibowle is best described as an augmented wine punch similar to Sangria. Instead of citrus, the wine is flavored with Waldmeister (Sweet Woodruff). By steeping leaves in wine the wine is imparted with a sweet herbal flavor that some people liken to sweet hay or lemon grass, others think it tastes of marzipan or almonds. My favorite description… “it tastes green”.

Traditionally, Maibowle is served on Maifest the May Day holiday… but any time during the spring you will find it on Menus or at gatherings. It’s a simple drink to put together, and great for parties.

Learn More about Maifest HERE–> What is Maifest?

Maibowle Recipe

Maibowle Recipe

Prep Time: 2 hours

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Yield: 10-12 servings

Maibowle Recipe

Maibowle or May Bowl is a Traditional German Sweet Woodruff infused wine Punch, traditionally served on May Day. It's the perfect thing for a bunch or warm afternoon party!

Ingredients

  • 1 Bottle (750 ml) Riesling Wine
  • 1 bunch (5-10 sprigs) Sweet Woodruff (Waldmeister)
  • 4 tsp. Superfine Sugar (if you like it sweeter)
  • 1 Bottle (750 ml) dry Champagne
  • optional-
  • - 4 Tbl. Brandy - preferably Asbach Uralt
  • Garnish- Fresh Strawberries, lemon slices, Sweet Woodruff sprigs

Instructions

    Begin a few hours before serving:
  • Let the Sweet Woodruff lay on a plate for a few hours to wilt a bit. If you are in a hurry, put it in the freezer for 30 minutes.
  • Steep the Sweet Woodruff in the Wine. Take care to keep the stem ends out of the wine. It's best to tie the stems together, then tie them to a wooden spoon laying across the bowl. 30 minutes should be enough, or the flavor may get too intense.... and you could get a headache!
    Before serving:
  • Take the Sweet Woodruff/ Waldmeister leaves out of the wine.
  • Pour the Steeped wine into a Punch Bowl or Large Jug
  • Add Sugar (if desired), Champagne, and Brandy (if desired)
  • Stir gently
  • Add some fresh strawberries- whole or slices- to the bowl.
  • Serve over ice.
  • You can also add sliced lemons

Notes

There is a milky substance in the stems of Sweet Woodruff/ Waldmeister that is quite bitter. You don't want this in your wine! Either bundle the herb with the stems up out of the wine, or strip the leaves from the stems, and throw the stems away.

http://germangirlinamerica.com/what-is-maibowle/

Quick Maibowle with Waldmeister Syrup

Waldmeister SirupWaldmeister Sirup

1/3 cup or 100 ml Waldmeistersirup
1 Bottle Dry White Wine
1 Bottle Champagne
1/3 cup or 100 ml Lemon Juice

Stir together and let chill for at least 20 minutes.
Serve over ice with a bit of lemon peel.





What is Sweet Woodruff? What is Waldmeister?

what is waldmeisterSweet Woodruff  is a green fragrant perennial that grows in shady places… this explains the German name Waldmeister, or Master of the Woods.  The leaves grow out in a star or wheel pattern… and the plant produces tiny white flowers. (Actually, this is the quickest method of distinguishing Sweet Woodruff and Lupine.)

A chemical called Coumarin makes Sweet Woodruff or Waldmeister smell so delicious.  Sweet Woodruff was frequently used in the Middle Ages as a Medicinal Herb for digestive issues, uterine cramps and menopause side effects. Herbalists would often pound it into a poultice to heal wounds and bruises. Also, because of it’s long lasting sweet smell, it was often stuffed into mattresses to make the bed smell better… or hung in churches as a symbol of humility. While Coumarin is mildly toxic to the kidneys, it is only in large quantities. Some especially sensitive people may experience dizziness, headaches or vomiting. If you are a migraine sufferer, you may want to go easy with Sweet Woodruff.

Buy Waldmeister/ Sweet Woodruff Plants or Seeds

Galium Sweet Woodruff Odoratum SeedGalium Sweet Woodruff Odoratum SeedSweet Woodruff > Galium odoratrum > Landscape Ready 1 gallon ContainerSweet Woodruff > Galium odoratrum > Landscape Ready 1 gallon Container

In Germany “Waldmeister Flavor” is associated with drinks, Waldmeister Jello (aka Gotterspeise), and Waldmeister syrups. It tends to be a wildly fluorescent and artificial green color (which is great for kids)…..You will also find it in a Berliner Weisse (which is great for adults).


Watch how to make Maibowle

The video is in German, but it’s easy to follow. It’s just a good way to see the technique..

Want More Bowle Recipes?

This little Kindle book is loaded with 20 delicious recipes for Bowle that you can serve for your next party.
Remember, you don’t need to own a Kindle, you just need to have the Kindle app installed. Click here–>Free Kindle App

Bowle: Die beliebtesten Rezepte (German Edition)Bowle: Die beliebtesten Rezepte (German Edition)

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what is maibowle

Comment(5)

  1. Please correct your post on Pflaumenkuchen. It is NOT made with Italian plums, since there really is no such thing. There are several, but none are Italian. Germans use a kind of prune plum and they grow most of it in country. Eastern European countries also use it, and again – it’s not an Italian plum, whatever that means.
    So much food is called Italian in the US, when it not. I do love your FB posts and follow them every day, or whenever I log on. Keep up the good work!
    Thanks!

    1. Italian plums are called Italian prune plums because they were the ones used to make prunes, usually by Italian or Yugoslavian orchardists. They had blue skins with yellowish green interiors.
      Other plums, eg Santa Rosa plums, had reddish skins with purple insides…and then there were the edible Japanese flowering plums, which made the very best jam… 🙂
      Raised in Santa Clara County, known for its orchard fruits, before it became Silicon Valley!!

  2. In the receipe, you should say lying across the spoon instead of laying across the spoon.
    Lie, lay, lain versus lay, laid, laid. If it is reclining, then use the first verb; if you are placing it
    somewhere, use the second!

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